About your Search

20130706
20130714
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
. here's a chart that shows america's trade deficit. and energy, imported energy comprises the largest account. we haven't had a balanced trade deficit since the 1970's when the job hemorrhage started in this country. and it gets worse every year. america's future depends on innovation. we can't continue to live like this. every community you go to in this country, they say, well, we have to move somewhere because my child can't find a job or, gosh, i had to get another job and i had my salary cut in half. it's pretty obvious what's been happening. the major category of trade deficits is energy imports. energy. because we are not self-sufficient in energy production in this country. part of the answer lies in new energy systems. systems that even nasa has helped us to begin to invent. yes, in the solar fields. yes, in new hydrogen technologies like cryogenic hydrogen. yes, in natural gas. thank goodness the department invested in fossil fuel technologies. that's where the fracking technologies came from. it came from thinking about the future, not living in the past. so the gentleman's
, cbo shows us $642 billion deficit, down to 4% gdp for this year, that is weighed down from 10.1% four years ago and if you will, that takes a little bit of the impetus for coming up with an embargo on tax reform, reduces that even if all the projections indicate that those large deficits come ring back. so i see this tax reform issue as being tougher. the other thing i will comment on and take your questions is the affordable care act. this is a very big deal for the services i indicated, a very challenging endeavor we saw last week with the administration delayed for a year mandate that employers provide certain categories of insurance or face penalties. clearly a recognition of the lack of readiness out there in the work force. you have seen a lot of interesting things happen there. i can tell you from indianapolis, i was eating the same day that announcement came out before i heard about it at a national chain and i don't cook. so i eat out. there are several restaurants that know me well and the manager was -- good restaurant, part of a pretty big chain, telling me it came down fr
in order. we have seen some good news with an economy that recovers. we have seen our annual deficit numbers go down, although i have to be somewhat -- look with somewhat jaundiced eyes when the press is saying hallelujah, this year our deficit may be only $746 billion. that still is not -- is not good enough. and the solution set that we're looking for is not that far away. so in a moment, i'm going to make a couple comments and then ask my colleague, the medicare of our budget committee, to once again make an offer to proceed with regular order, something that has been the back stop of this debate about rules, something that our colleagues on the other side of the aisle, perhaps appropriately, beat us over the head for three years on about the fact that we ought to have a regular order around the budget. well, it's now been 110 days since the united states senate approved a budget. after a marathon session that went until 5:00 in the morning, a session that i think even our colleagues on the other side who didn't vote for the budget would agree was open and appropriate to rules and
meltdown. and federal dollars are very scares. as we face this huge deficit together, we have to look at every option available to meet the challenges of doing more with less. i urge my colleagues to support my amendment. and i yield back. the chair: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey rise? mr. frelinghuysen: i move to strike the last word. i rise to oppose the amendment of the the gentleman from georgia. his amendment would cut $15 million. i should say for the record, we cut $220 million from last year's number and so we have substantially reduced this account. let me just say, too, the basic science program within the department conducts research with a staggering potential for benefits for our nation. cutting the program further, which is what he seeks, threatens our long-term energy security, first american scientists and industry and blemishes our credibility as a world-wide leader in basic science programs. i oppose his amendment and urge others to do likewise. i yield back. ms. kaptur: i move to strike the las
the deficit and ultimately address the towering debt that we're facing as a country, not only today but even the worse debt we'll be facing given the current trend we're on in the future. mr. chairman, remember when we were told to get our tires properly inflated and people snickered saying, is this an energy policy? well, at least those ideas actually saved energy and actually saved cost. albeit a drop in the bucket. but now in one of its latest efforts, along comes the department of energy and proposes a regulation to impose destructive and unnecessary energy efficiency standards for ceiling fans. and like much of their agenda, it is completely counterproductive. it's big government run amuck, another example. it's an example of the complete disregard bureaucrats have for the practical implications of the regulations that they issue. the department of energy contends that a certain amount of energy would be saved by requiring greater efficiency from ceiling fans, as the gentlelady mentioned and explained. now, of course, that ignores the fact that ceiling fans are already far more energy e
student loan interest rates at current levels for two years without adding a penny to the deficit. because of this obstruction, loan rates doubled on july 1, piling thousands of dollars more of debt, mor that more than 7 mn students owe. republicans are push planning to balance the budget right on the backs of struggling students. if the legislation passed by house republicans or the plan by senate republicans becomes law, student loan rates would more than double over the next few years as interest rates increased. the speaker, speaker boehner, has said that the house has acted and now the ball is in the senate's house. we talked about that yesterday, madam president. what is he talking about? they've acted and now we should act. i guess we could talk about what he this didn't do last year on the farm bill. i guess we could talk about what they didn't do last year on the post office. i guess we could talk about what they haven't done this year on the farm bill. we could talk about what they haven't done that is so devastating to small businesses around america; that is, having people who
. host: we'll let you go there. guest: i think that the trade deficit had been an issue for the u.s. there have been a lot of jobs, essentially we opened up ourselves to the world from a global trade perspective and we didn't really put a lot of emphasis on making sure that the other countries that we were doing business with had, say, the same labor standards, the same pay levels. so many american workers were thrown into competition with a huge global competition with workers willing to be paid a lot less. so a lot of that work was transferred there. some people say that's the way it goes and how the global economy moves around. that might be the case. but that doesn't mean there aren't jobs americans can't do. and the definition of doing something that your caller -- i agree that there are do-nothing jobs in every organization probably. but the point that your caller was making i think there are -- the definition of doing something is very broad and there are a lot of thing that is need to be done in this country including services jobs that aren't getting filled by the private
with the law. and would boost our economy and make our country safer, reducing the deficit by about a trillion dollars over the next two decades. i remind the speaker there is no shame in passing bills both parties can support. americans want their elected officials to work together to fix the nation's problems. that's what we did in the senate. i promise the formula will work in the house of representatives as well. the speaker should try that. sticking to the hastert rule is preventing the house from passing legislation to reform the ailing postal service. he refused to even take it up last congress. didn't even take it up. sticking to the hastert rule prevented the house from passing a measure that would give brick-and-mortar stores parity. we passed it on a bipartisan vote here, mr. president. i mean it's heartbreaking all over america, i see it in nevada to go by these strip malls and you see these places that if they had the advantage of not having to pay sales tax -- that's what happens on line -- they would be in business. they would go back into business if the online -- the sales tax
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8